AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine

The world’s most powerful naturally aspirated eight-cylinder engine – made by Mercedes-AMGMercedes-AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine, 2005

Mercedes-AMG has taken a completely new departure: the new AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine is the first in the world to combine the high-revving concept with a large displacement. Developed entirely by AMG, this high-performance engine has a displacement of 6.3 litres and generates an output of 375 kW/510 hp at 6800 rpm, plus a maximum torque of 630 Nm (465 lb-ft), which makes the new power pack by AMG the world’s most powerful naturally aspirated eight-cylinder production engine. Thanks to its large displacement, the V8 by AMG develops around 20 percent more torque than comparable naturally aspirated engines in this performance class.Mercedes-AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine, 2005

Made completely from high-strength aluminium, this naturally aspirated V8 engine has a wealth of exciting features derived from motorsport, and impressively documents the successful motor racing history of AMG. Together with a variable intake manifold featuring two integral throttle flaps, the vertical arrangement of the intake and exhaust ducts ensures perfect cylinder charging. Bucket tappets in the cylinder heads allow a stiff valve train and therefore high engine speeds. Variable camshaft adjustment, a particularly rigid closed-deck crankcase and cylinder walls with a new, revolutionary LDS coating are further attributes of this ultra-modern V8 engine made by Mercedes-AMG.

This eight-cylinder unit was developed to series production maturity entirely by the efforts of the engineers and technicians in Affalterbach. The new M156 (in-house designation) engine will shortly be presented in a new high-performance AMG car, and is destined to provide both emotional and physical driving pleasure in other AMG cars in the future.

Mercedes-Benz E 63 AMG (W 211), 2006

E 63 AMG Sedan

The high expectations of AMG customers and the impressive history of AMG eight-cylinder engines were both an incentive and an obligation for the engineers and product planners at Mercedes-AMG GmbH to come up with a superlative new V8 power unit. A mere glance at the key technical data shows that this has been achieved: from a displacement of 6208 cc, the AMG V8 aluminium engine develops a peak output 375 kW/510 hp at 6800 rpm and a maximum torque of 630 Nm (465 lb-ft) which is available from 5200 rpm. The maximum engine speed is 7200 rpm.

Mercedes-AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine, M156, 2005This unique combination of a fast-running concept and a large displacement achieves the best of both worlds: exhilarating flexibility accompanied by high torque at low engine speeds. The driver experiences the decidedly sporty character of the engine in the form of great agility and dynamic responsiveness in all engine speed ranges. The new AMG V8 already delivers 500 Nm (368 lb-ft) to the crankshaft at 2000 rpm, while the maximum of 630 Nm (465 lb-ft) is on tap at 5200 rpm – more than any other naturally aspirated engine in this output and displacement class. In short, the new AMG eight-cylinder guarantees dynamic acceleration, rapid intermediate sprints and sheer driving pleasure at the highest level.

Mercedes-Benz C 63 AMG Coupé Black Series (C 204), 2011

C 63 AMG Coupé Black Series (C 204)

With its new, sporty AMG exhaust note which was designed during an extensive series of tests, the eight-cylinder unit from Affalterbach offers the excitement of a naturally-aspirated, fast-running V8 engine in unmistakable audible and palpable form at low, medium and high engine speeds.

Unique variable intake manifold and revolutionary cylinder wallsMercedes-AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine, M156, 2005

Apart from the large overall displacement, the extremely high output and torque is above all due to the sophisticated intake system – a completely new departure for AMG. Its major characteristics are large cross-sections, the streamlined design of the entire intake and exhaust manifolds, and the vertical arrangement of all ducts in line with motor-racing practice. The newly developed and patented variable intake manifold, which is made of magnesium and has two parallel-action internal throttle flaps, is a world first. The combined action of these components, which are highly unusual in regular engine production, ensures perfect cylinder charging.Mercedes-AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine, M156, 2005

The 32 valves in the cylinder heads are operated by bucket tappets for a rigid valve train and high engine speeds – a technology which has proved its worth in motor racing. Continuous adjustment of the camshafts on the intake and exhaust sides is another special feature of this up-to-date AMG V8 engine. The interior of this powerful new development conceals yet another genuine world first, too: as the world’s first regular production engine, the AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine features a special twin-wire-arc-sprayed (TWAS) coating on the cylinder walls, a new process which produces outstandingly low friction.Mercedes-Benz SL-Class, SL 63 AMG, R 230

Motor racing genes are once again obvious in the crankcase: as in the supercharged AMG V8 engine for the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, the engineers and technicians opted for a particularly rigid bedplate design with closed-deck technology. Special, cast-in steel components ensure even more rigidity, a reliable oil supply in all everyday operating situations and optimal long-term durability.

Completely autonomous development from Affalterbach

At Mercedes-AMG, each engine is traditionally set up by hand, in keeping with the philosophy "one man, one engine."

At Mercedes-AMG, each engine is traditionally set up by hand, in keeping with the philosophy “one man, one engine.”

In design terms the new eight-cylinder engine by Mercedes-AMG is the first completely autonomous development to have no features or shared parts whatsoever in common with other eight-cylinder units by Mercedes-Benz. The new 6.3-litre unit differs from the other AMG V8 engines based on Mercedes designs in the distance between cylinders, the crankcase concept, the sophisticated intake and exhaust manifolds and the valve train; the bore/stroke ratio is also a completely new departure for Mercedes-AMG. The new powerpack is produced at the ultra-modern AMG engine workshops, according to the “one man, one engine” philosophy. This means that a single technician assembles the complete engine by hand – as witness his signature on the engine’s AMG badge.Mercedes-AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine, M156, 2005. At Mercedes-AMG, each engine is traditionally set up by hand, in keeping with the philosophy "one man, one engine."

Know-how from motor sports

  • Particularly rigid bedplate crankcase of closed-deck design
  • Cylinder walls with a unique, revolutionary TWAS coating
  • Completely new dual-length intake manifold with integral throttle flaps
  • Vertical air ducts, valve control by bucket tappets
  • Completely autonomous development from Affalterbach

Mercedes-Benz M-Class, ML 63 AMG „Performance Studio“ (W 164), 2008More than three decades of know-how gained in GT and Touring Car championships, as well as great experience in the production of powerful, high-performance engines, went into the design of the new AMG 6.3-litre eight-cylinder engine. The special production facilities at the Affalterbach location were already taken into consideration during the development and conceptual phases, which allowed freedom of action and new possibilities for the engine’s designers. The resulting masterpiece was only made possible by a unique combination of extremely advanced engine and materials technology.

Sophisticated air ducting for a high outputMercedes-Benz C 63 AMG Coupé Black Series (C 204), 2011

Apart from the large overall displacement of precisely 6208 cc, the extremely high output and torque is above all due to the sophisticated intake system – a completely new departure for AMG. Together with the innovative, variable intake manifold of magnesium with two integral throttle flaps, the large air intake cross-sections familiar from motorsport, the streamlined design of the intake and exhaust ducting and the vertical arrangement of the intake and exhaust ducts ensure that all eight cylinders are perfectly charged.

Patented variable intake manifold with two internal throttle flapsMercedes-AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine, 2005

The patented, dual-length intake manifold with two internal throttle flaps is a world first. Its task is to ensure a strong torque curve by lengthening the airflow distance at low engine speeds. At higher engine speeds the intake manifold switches to short airflow distances to achieve a high peak performance. The switching process is monitored by the electronic engine management system, vacuum-controlled depending on the engine load and engine speed, and imperceptible to the vehicle’s occupants.

Mercedes-Benz SL-Class, SL 63 AMG, R 230

SL 63 AMG (R 230)

The interior of the light, die-cast magnesium intake manifold features two electronically operated throttle flaps which are adjustable within fractions of a second: they can be opened to their maximum in just 100 milliseconds, and the driver perceives this as extraordinary responsiveness. The air intake at the front of the vehicle is of dual-flow design; two integral hot film airflow sensors behind the air filters provide the engine electronics with the necessary information about the temperature and density of the intake air.Mercedes-Benz E 63 AMG (W 211), 2006

With the help of complex flow simulations the engineers at Mercedes-AMG have precisely configured all the intake ducting to meet the requirements of the large engine displacement and the resulting large air volumes. 

Valve operation by bucket tappets, as in the racing enginesMercedes-AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine, M156, 2005

Another special feature of the new AMG V8 engine is the sophisticated valve train, which is also derived from the powerful AMG racing engines. The 32 valves in the cylinder heads are operated by bucket tappets. Their space-saving design allows a stiff valve train and therefore high engine speeds with large valve opening cross-sections, which in turn benefits output and torque. The large intake valves have a diameter of 40 mm, while their opposite numbers on the exhaust side measure 34 mm.Mercedes-AMG 6.3-litre V8 engine, 2005

In contrast to a racing engine, the valve clearances are automatically adjusted by a hydraulic mechanism – the customer benefits from long, variable service intervals and low costs.

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